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Does a Privacy Fence Add Value to Your Home?

Replacing an existing fence or adding a new fence that delivers more privacy can increase your home's value in several ways. We'll explore key factors to help you determine if a privacy fence is a smart investment.

All types of privacy fences offer benefits but involve real costs. This article will walk you through the pros and cons to help you decide what's right for your home and budget.


Security

Peace of mind for you and your family's safety is paramount, and a secure property also boosts your home's value. In fact, safety and security rank high on most people's "must have" lists. That's why a property shielded by a privacy or security fence will have more value because more security reduces the chance of potential loss from theft.

Fortunately, you have many options to secure your fence. Some of these options include: 

  • Automatic gates opened by remote control
  • Having a gate code
  • Using motion-sensor lights
  • Installing additional outdoor lighting

Top material choices for a durable fence include wrought iron, steel, thick wood, and reinforced PVC.


Curb Appeal

An attractive and well-designed fence can complement a home's exterior in ways few other features can. Because it's often the first thing people notice when approaching, matching your home's overall design is key. The right privacy fence boosts curb appeal, making your home more enticing to potential buyers.

wooden privacy fence surrounding a home
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Wood, stone, wrought iron, hedges, trees, and combinations add privacy while giving visual flair. A professionally installed, thoughtfully designed privacy fence can be a distinctive, practical addition to enhance curb appeal.

Classic wood, faux wood composites, or decorative wrought iron give the best return on investment for aesthetics. Avoid chain links and cinder block fences if resale value is important.


Property Lines

As a homeowner, you've likely had to find your property lines. An existing fence may have already defined them. You may have also obtained a plot map from the city or hired a surveyor to determine the boundaries.

If you don't know where your property lines are, you must locate them prior to installing a privacy fence. Letting your neighbors know your fencing plans is also a good idea. 

Real estate with clear title history and documentation is most desirable to buyers, sellers, and agents. Having defined property lines smooths the buying and selling process.


Privacy

A privacy fence delivers seclusion in crowded areas lacking privacy — near busy streets and urban neighborhoods — and from nosy neighbors.

Sometimes, tall fences shield homes in exclusive neighborhoods like Hollywood or Beverly Hills, and they are often higher than the houses. However, many municipalities and homeowners associations have height restrictions for residential fences.

Consult your city or county building codes and talk to your HOA officials to learn about laws about how high your new or replacement fence can be.

wooden privacy fence surrounded by flowers
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Sometimes, homeowners substitute the idea of installing a privacy hedge instead of a fence. A tall, distinguished, well-grown hedge undoubtedly adds value if it complements a home's design.


Safety

With small kids or pets, a fence lets you open doors without constant worry, creating an enclosed outdoor play area. A fence gives children and animals more freedom to roam safely, allowing everyone to enjoy the backyard without worrying about them wandering off. Fences also deter wild animals and neighbors' pets from coming onto your property.

A solid privacy fence prevents deer and other wildlife from entering your property. Perimeter fences help control large acreages.


Costs and Considerations

While beneficial, a privacy fence still carries costs. Expect to invest $3,000 to $7,000 for professional installation, varying by length and materials chosen. DIY installs reduce the expense but require significant labor.

Proper maintenance, such as regular staining and fixing broken boards, keeps your fence looking sharp. Check if your homeowners association limits height or materials allowed, and be sure to get proper permits beforehand.

Today's Homeowner Tips

Carefully weigh the addition of front yard fences, as they can seem unwelcoming if visibility is too limited. Keep the height lower in front or use semi-transparent materials like decorative metal or spaced wood planks.


Learn More About Home Fencing


So, Does a Privacy Fence Add Property Value?

Installing a privacy fence benefits most homeowners in terms of home value. It enhances security, defines property lines, improves aesthetics, and creates a secluded backyard oasis. Choose durable, low-maintenance materials matching your home's style, and find a talented installer for a professional look.

While expensive initially, added privacy, security, and improved aesthetics and functionality tend to outweigh up-front costs over time.

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FAQs About Privacy Fences

What is the most popular material?

Wood and faux wood composites are the top choices. Rot-resistant cedar and redwood are good options for a natural look. Durable, low-maintenance composites like Trex are also popular.


What’s the best height?

A height of 6 feet blocks views without being too intrusive. Rear and side yard fences up to 8 feet are common. Keep front yard fences lower, around 3 to 4 feet.


How much does a six-foot fence cost?

Expect to pay $15 to $25 per linear foot for basic wood with professional installation. A 100-foot fence would cost $1,500 to $2,500 installed. Premium materials like composite, iron, or stone can exceed $50 per foot.


Do I need a permit?

Most areas require permits for new fences. Check with your local zoning office to confirm. Permits ensure proper setbacks from property lines and compliance with height limits.


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