Wooster Sherlock Professional Paint Roller Frame
Wooster Sherlock Professional Paint Roller Frame

The Wooster 9” professional paint roller frame incorporates a retaining spring to hold the roller sleeve securely on the frame while allowing for easy removal by tapping the roller frame on the edge of a paint bucket.

The roller frame also has twin bearings to reduce friction and allow the sleeve to turn easily.

Watch this video to find out more.

Further Information

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT
Jodi Marks: You know I love painting projects, especially when the right tool makes my project go so much faster and easier, and take a look at this. This is the Wooster 9-inch Sherlock roller.

And what sets this apart is, first of all, I like the fact that it has these springs right here. So that when I slide my roller into place, you see how it locks on, that prevents the roller from walking off of the handle, which it so often does when you’re in the middle of your painting project.

I like the handle, it’s got a nice grip, so it’s easy to maneuver. But I have to say, the biggest thing that I like about this, is that it makes cleanup easier. How, you ask? Well, let me show you.

Instead of having to grip the roller and slide it off, all you have to do—and of course it might be a little easier with the weight of the paint on this, but since this is dry—look. I have a bucket right here where I would want to dispose of it.

All I have to do is tap it really hard on the side of the bucket, and I’ve got a clean roller handle ready to go again.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Please describe in detail exactly how a paint roller cover should properly fit its frame/cage assembly. I say anything less than a closed end (no too-short or too narrow gaps) gaps at both ends invite inadvertent paint run-off that’s left behind begging for a repeat run over. I see it now with new combinations responding as mentioned. But for years gone by have also seen the combination function without reason to do the same because the fit prevented such reservoirs:
    covers too long for the cage…and, covers vs. cage end cap diameters, exposed entrances to hollow gathering from which lines and tear-drop high spots develop. The culprit isn’t always the fault of the human arm. I’ve painted for years when a good brand paint plainly and simply performed beyond reproach. Now, even top grade mfrs
    have to buy their way back into the markets by advertising “paint/primer combo for more money” instead of apologizing for creating the consumer scam by improper balance of integrity and titanium oxide.
    Thank you for reading my frustration.

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