Peeling paint above shower surround.
Peeling paint is common in bathrooms, especially near the shower.

Peeling paint is a common problem in bathrooms due to the high humidity and moisture found there. To keep bathroom paint from peeling, run a bathroom fan that’s vented to the outside every time you shower or bath, and keep it running for 10-15 minutes after you’re through to expel as much of the moist air as possible.

To repair peeling bathroom paint:

  1. Use a scraper to remove any peeling paint.
  2. Sand the area smooth with medium grit sandpaper.
  3. Prime the area with a moisture resistant primer.
  4. Caulk any joints between the wall and adjoining areas, such as the shower surround.
  5. Apply two coats of a quality eggshell or semi-gloss that’s made for high moisture areas.

Watch this video to find out more.

Can’t remember to turn on the bath vent fan? This humidity sensing vent fan can do it for you.

Further Information

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT
Danny Lipford: Jennifer asks, “Why do I have peeling paint in my bathroom?”

The reason you see so much peeling paint in a bathroom is because there’s more moisture in this room than any other room in the house. So that’s why it’s so important to use your bath vent fan every time you take a shower. And for 10 or 15 minutes after your shower, let it run and make sure you’re getting rid of all of the moisture.

But then, when it’s time to attack some of the peeling areas like this, first of all you want to scrape all of the excess peeling paint off. Then you want to sand it a little bit. Then apply a coat of primer to all of the problem areas. Then make sure you use a good quality caulk to caulk wherever the drywall touches your shower stall or tub area.

After that, two more coats of paint and I would suggest using either eggshell or semi-gloss to really provide a more washable surface and one that’s a lot more resistant to moisture.

8 COMMENTS

  1. As I am scraping the paint, some areas of the peeling paint fall away down to drywall, some do not. How do I approach this?

    Also, running around the top of the fiberglass shower, there is a 2″ or so plastic rim between the shower itself and the drywall. What is this? How do I approach this while scraping? How do I approach this in preparing for new paint?

    Thank you.

  2. *** Same questions as to the above ****

    As I am scraping the paint, some areas of the peeling paint fall away down to drywall, some do not. How do I approach this?

    Also, running around the top of the fiberglass shower, there is a 2″ or so plastic rim between the shower itself and the drywall. What is this? How do I approach this while scraping? How do I approach this in preparing for new paint?

    Thank you.

  3. We painted over white wall board with an expensive good quality satin finish with primer added in that was supposed to be great for moisture. The paint is just pealing off just by touching it. Should I have used semi gloss? It’s a very small bathroom. And the paint has a lifetime warranty. Please help!

  4. I’m in a rental house where the paint is chipping & peeling in the bathroom, after living there less than a year. There is a fan that is connected to the light in the bathroom for moisture. This is not something the landlord will deal with. How do I know he did the job right the first time, if its already falling apart. How do I know if I am safe?

  5. If after removing peeled paint and what you have left is drywall…or below the paper of the drywall you will need to apply plaster of paris to the area. Plaster is mixed with water to the consistence of creamy peanut butter. Apply plaster in a thin coat spreading to a feather like appearance around the edges. Let dry completely and then sand with 110 grit lightly until even…then fine 220 grit to remove any lines from previous sanding. Once sanding is finished you can paint with primer…then paint.

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