Condensation on Windows: What You Can Do About It | Ep. 150

Condensation on windows in the winter
(©Nick Beer, stock.adobe.com)

Condensation on windows causes more than unsightly wet glass. It can lead to bigger problems. That’s why Marvin, from Alabama, needs help.  

“Our double-pane 20-year-old windows produce lots of moisture every time the outside temperature drops below 45 degrees,” he says. “The moisture then drips down on the wooden windowsill.”

Marvin says the water seems to be mostly on the very bottoms of the windows, and his wife wipes if off with a rag each morning to prevent rot on the windowsill.  

“We keep our inside home heat at 70 degrees during the winter,” he says. “Is there any way to prevent this from happening?”

This couple has a humidity issue. When the outside temperature is below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, the inside humidity should be between 25% and 40%. You can measure humidity with a simple battery-operated hygrometer that costs less than $20.

Once you’ve identified the problem, you need to do something about it. In this case, that could mean running the heating system more often to mitigate the humidity issue.

If you’re seeing condensation at the bottom of the window’s upper and lower sashes, air could be leaking in. So, make sure the weatherstripping is doing its job, or add new weatherstripping.

And don’t forget to use your range hood in the kitchen and bathroom vent fans to keep the humidity down.

Finally, you can always purchase a dehumidifier to counter the problem.

Skip to [11:40] for the full segment on the Today’s Homeowner Podcast.

In this episode, we also cover Danny and Joe’s childhood Christmas memories and special holiday stories. See photos and video here.  


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Simple Solutions

Pallet Christmas Tree—Here’s how to make a decorative Christmas tree from an old wooden pallet. Start by marking two diagonal lines from the top of the pallet down to the second to the last slat on each side. Next, use a circular saw to cut along the lines, then pry off the slats on the back. Cut four pieces of wood to make a simple base. Paint it green and decorate with lights, garland and Christmas ornaments. 

Watch: How to Make a DIY Christmas Tree from a Wooden Pallet

Nontoxic Oven Cleaner—Here’s a recipe for an effective nontoxic oven cleaner that produces no noxious fumes. Add two orange peels to a jar and fill with white vinegar. Let the jar sit for about a week. Use a funnel to pour the vinegar solution into a plant mister. Sprinkle baking soda on the oven and glass door, then spray the vinegar solution. Wait 20 minutes, then wipe the surfaces with a scouring sponge. Repeat, if necessary.

Watch: How to Clean Inside an Oven Door’s Glass  


Question of the Week

Q: Help! We’re remodeling our bathroom, which included removing the bathtub and plumbing. When capping off the water pipes, my husband (the uncoordinated one in the family), spilled PVC pipe cleaner on a cultured marble vanity top. How do I remove the stains?

A: You can certainly try to save the vanity top, but there are no guarantees. Fortunately, your husband spilled the pipe cleaner, which is clear. Soak a cloth in white vinegar and lay it over the stain for several hours. Then mix a paste of water and Bar Keeper’s Friend and spread it onto the stain, wait overnight and scrub it.

Skip to [27:30] for the full segment on the Today’s Homeowner’s Podcast.


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