Easy Ways to Refresh Your Home’s Front Entry

Wooden house with red door and nice front entry
Your home’s exterior can look as good as new after some concrete resurfacing, pressure washing and mulching. (DepositPhotos)

Refreshing your home’s front entry doesn’t require tons of work or expense. These three simple changes can make a big impact.

Try them and your home will be the best-looking one on the block!


Repaired front porch with Quikrete Re-Cap
Refreshing your front entry starts with cleaning and updating the stoop or front porch.

1. Resurface a Concrete Stoop

Home improvement doesn’t have to cost a lot. Resurfacing a worn-out stoop is a great start toward completely transforming your home’s front entry.

Damaged front porch
An unsightly stoop isn’t very welcoming. Fortunately, there’s an easy fix.

This stoop has two problems: the surface is unsightly and has seen much better days, and the steps have lots of bricks with gaps.

Both these things are hurting the home’s curb appeal, but the situation goes beyond looks.

Gaps aren’t just unattractive; they also make the bricks difficult to walk on. Worse, they collect water, which can undermine the home’s foundation.


Giving concrete resurfacer a broom finish
Quikrete Re-Cap Concrete Resurfacer is easy to apply and the impact is instant.

Fortunately, the solution is simple: First, clean the stoop with a 3,500-psi pressure washer. Next, apply Quikrete Re-Cap Concrete Resurfacer with a squeegee, trowel or brush — work quickly, since the product dries fast! Finally, add a textured finish to prevent slips.

As for the stairs’ hazardous cracks and crevices? Just fill them with mortar.

The result is a lighter, brighter stoop that instantly elevates the front entry’s appearance — and sealing the steps’ cracks made them safer and long-lasting.


A homemade wooden window box installed under a window on a brick home
Soften your home’s appearance with colorful flowers in window boxes.

2. Install Window Boxes

Window boxes filled with colorful flowers add instant character to your front and entry and curb appeal. They come in all kinds of materials and styles to match any home’s architecture.

Plastic, resin and composite window boxes are popular, but you also can choose from clay, stone, steel and ceramic options. 

You can build traditional wood window boxes or purchase low-maintenance ones that add charm and texture to your home’s siding.

Consider your budget, not just style, before purchasing window boxes.

Metal planters filled with coconut liners look great on rustic homes and cost about $20 each. Vinyl self-watering window boxes are attractive and efficient, but convenience comes at a cost — over $100.

Consider function, durability and sustainability as well. Desirable features include rust, UV and weather resistance; paintable surfaces, drainage holes or an attached saucer; and recyclable materials. 


Outdoor lantern, viewed close up, on the side of a front door
Replace the light fixture beside your front door to elevate your home’s appearance.

3. Replace Light Fixture

If your front entry looks worse for the wear, an outdated light fixture doesn’t help. Guests see wall lights the moment they approach your door, so upgrade them with something dazzling.

The home center has lots of options, but narrowing the search is easy. Just make a list of the material, color, features and glass type you’d like.

Metal is a popular material, but outdoor wall lights also come in aluminum, plastic and stainless steel options. Colors range from a timeless black to bronze, brushed nickel, chrome and copper.

As for features, consider the light fixture’s weather and rust resistance, along with options that match your needs. For instance, is the light fixture waterproof? Is the light dimmable, or automated to turn on at dusk and off at dawn?

Then, choose between clear, textured and frosted glass.

Plan your dream outdoor lighting setup before setting foot in the home center for a remarkable, functional result.

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4 COMMENTS

  1. I would love to have my front door way look as Beautiful as you show in your photos I would only love to have roses by the walkway I’m disabled and on a fix income and I could not afford that
    Gary Larzik

  2. Hi Mr. Danny & Chelsea!
    I’m shopping for hand railings
    for front steps (3) to my raised house and side steps @ Porté Cochere. The steps leading to front porch are cement. I’m attempting DIY and wonder which is recommended-side options vs concrete installed options as well as which materials you’d recommend..aluminum, rod iron, etc.

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